Monroe College's Bronx campus is an ideal urban campus located in the bustling Fordham section.

New Rochelle

Located in downtown New Rochelle, the Monroe College New Rochelle campus is nestled in a diverse, thriving suburban community in Westchester County.

St. Lucia

The scenic Monroe College St. Lucia campus in Barnard Hill Castries on the Caribbean island of St. Lucia combines the best of many worlds.


Monroe's Queens Extension Site is located in the heart of downtown Flushing, a vibrant and ethnically mixed district of Queens.

  • History of Online at Monroe College

    The moment you log on as a Monroe student, you are part of a tradition that goes back more than eight decades. Back in 1933, the College began modestly in the West Farms Section of the Bronx. With four classrooms and seven students, it was known as the Monroe College of Business. Through the leadership of founder Mildred King and then Harry Jerome, the College continued to grow and expand. But after WWII, that steady growth exploded, as thousands of returning GIs and Americans on the home front found themselves in need of new career skills.

    One of these skills was called data processing and it used punch card technology. In the sixties, punch cards became IBM computers and, consistent with its mission of real-world application, Monroe opened a computing division. By the late 1960s, swelling enrollment led to the opening of the current Fordham campus.

    In addition to academic relevance and real-world education, Monroe has always been a genuine family of support and encouragement to its students—reflected in the continued leadership of the Jerome Family. When Harry retired in 1978 after decades of dedicated service, his son Stephen took over as president, a position he continues to hold to this day.

    Several years into Stephen’s tenure, the 1980s saw the addition of a new, suburban campus in New Rochelle designed to serve the Westchester community. It would also function as campus home to Monroe’s growing national and international community. Through the nineties, Monroe continued to expand its curriculum with courses and skills most in demand by employers.

    In 1998, at the forefront of the digital age, Monroe offered its first distance learning class. Today there are multiple online courses and, with the arrival of broadband and Wi-Fi technology, the term “distance learning” is now more appropriately named “online learning.” Streaming video, live chat sessions and interactive presentations together with Monroe’s faculty and staff support equals the Monroe online experience—a campus for the 21st century. Anytime, anywhere our students can log on, they are part of a whole new generation of students for whom a college education is attainable. Know that as education continues to change, Monroe will change right along with it.